Rackham's Fairies, Elves and Goblins: More than 80 Full-Color Illustrations

Rackham's Fairies, Elves and Goblins: More than 80 Full-Color Illustrations

Language: English

Pages: 15

ISBN: 0486460231

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Through his extraordinarily drawn interpretations of favorite fairy tales and fantastic literature, Arthur Rackham (1867�1939) remains an enduring legend of the Victorian era's Golden Age of Illustration. Rackham took the printing developments of the early twentieth century further than any other artist of his time, masterfully manipulating the latest color processes. At once a technical and artistic genius, Rackham had few equals when it came to the use of muted color, ambience, and expressive lines.
This magnificent collection displays more than eighty of Arthur Rackham's most beguiling illustrations. These phantasmagoric renderings spring from such literary legends as Rip Van Winkle, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Aesop's Fables, Puck of Pook's Hill, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, and A Wonder Book. From the loveliest fairy to the most grotesque goblin, Rackham's art captures the wonder, innocence, and adventure that forever stir the human heart.

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environmental laws and eliminates the need for international freight shipping, a major contributor to global air pollution. And printing on recycled paper helps minimize our consumption of trees, water and fossil fuels. The text ot Rackham’s Fairies, Elves and Goblins was printed on paper made with 10% post-consumer waste, and the cover was printed on paper made with 10% post-consumer waste. According to Environmental Defense’s Paper Calculator, by using this innovative paper instead of

they never meet in grove or green, By fountain clear, or spangled starlight sheen But they do square 20 Fairies, away! We shall chide downright, if I longer stay A MIDSUMMER-NIGHT’S DREAM by William Shakespeare (continued) 21 Come, now a roundel 22 Some war with rere-mice for their leathern wings 23 To make my small elves coats 24 One aloof stand sentinel 25 I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid 26 Enter Peaseblossom, Cobweb, Moth, and Mustardseed 27 . . . and her fairy sent To bear

themselves more comely than before. 68 They come in making a riotous and unruly noise. 69 Calling shapes, and beckoning shadows dire. 70 Blew meager Hag, or stubborn unlaid ghost That breaks his magick chains at curfeu time 71 No goblin, or swart faery of the mine, Hath hurtfull power o’re true virginity. 72 The wonted roar was up amidst the Woods, And fill’d the Air with barbarous dissonance 73 The Water Nymphs, that in the bottom plaid, Held up their pearled wrists and took her in. 74 By all

“Go!” she says, “Go with my Leave an’ Goodwill.” The Pool of Tears Why, Mary Ann, what are you doing here? If Orpheus first produced the Waltz They’s such very odd heads and such very odd tales ... the moon, like to a silver bow New-bent in heaven And now they never meet in grove or green, By fountain clear, or spangled starlight sheen But they do square Fairies, away! We shall chide downright, if I longer stay Come, now a roundel Some war with rere-mice for their leathern wings To make

old gentleman who wandered all day in the gardens. When he heard Peter’s voice he popped in alarm behind a tulíp. These tricky fairies sometimes change the board on a ball night. When her Majesty wants to know the tíme. Peter Pan is the fairies’ orchestra. A chrysanthemum heard her, and said pointedly, “Hoity-toity, what is this?” Fairies never say, “We feel happy”; what they say is, “We feel dancey.” Building the house for Maimie. The fir-tree and the Bramble The Travellers and the

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