Drawing in Color - Animals

Drawing in Color - Animals

Lee Hammond

Language: English

Pages: 80

ISBN: 1581802730

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This, the fourth book in the Drawing in Color series, teaches readers how to draw realistic animals with colored pencils. Lee Hammond's amazing easy-to-follow techniques enable you to render a variety of wonderful animals, from cats and dogs to horses, squirrels, tigers and more. These skills can be used to draw any kind of mammal accurately. Hammond's special graphing system makes all the difference, helping to translate the animal poses seen into drawings on the page. You'll also learn other important illustration techniques, including layering, blending and shading. Additional guidelines help duplicate realistic eyes, ears, mouths, feet, fur, and hide. You'll feel like you can draw from the start with achievable examples, even if you're a first-timer.

Leonardo da Vinci, Volume 1 (Temporis Collection)

Mastering Landscape Photography

Parallels and Paradoxes: Explorations in Music and Society

Strokes of Genius 3 (Strokes of Genius: The Best of Drawing)

Adventures in Letterpress

Criterion Designs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I've tried to use a colored board and add the white, but it ends up looking flaky and mottled instead of smooth. Small areas, such as the bridle on the previous illustration, can be burnished in. This is another example of reflective color. Although the color of the horse is white and dapple-gray, shades of blue and green reflect off of the fur. This is very obvious below the eye and on the muzzle. For the gray tones, I used a combination of warm and cool grays. The warm grays have more of a

I've tried to use a colored board and add the white, but it ends up looking flaky and mottled instead of smooth. Small areas, such as the bridle on the previous illustration, can be burnished in. This is another example of reflective color. Although the color of the horse is white and dapple-gray, shades of blue and green reflect off of the fur. This is very obvious below the eye and on the muzzle. For the gray tones, I used a combination of warm and cool grays. The warm grays have more of a

not damage or rough up your paper surface. The Pink Pearl eraser is a good eraser for general cleaning. I use it the most when I am cleaning large areas, such as backgrounds. It is also fairly easy on the paper surface. The typewriter eraser looks like a pencil with a little brush on the end of it. It is a highly abrasive eraser, good for removing stubborn marks from the paper. It can also be used to get into tight places or to create clean edges. However, great care must be taken when using

front on this example, so the shadow areas are off to the sides. 2 Build your tone with the Chocolate Brown until it looks like mine. This area is the halftone. Lighten your touch as you move toward the full light area. 3 With a tortillion, smooth the tones. Begin in the dark areas and work toward the lighter ones, lightening your touch as you go. Can you see how the color changes when blended? It takes on a warmer appearance. The Cylinder Lightly sketch the shape of the cylinder

mouths of animals will also vary from species to species. Because of the different needs and living conditions each animal has, their noses and mouths are designed to aid in their existence. For instance, the soft nose and mouth of a vegetarian bunny do not have the same requirements and characteristics found in a meat-eating tiger. Study the various noses and mouths presented here. Ask yourself what importance the shapes have to that particular animal. Is it an animal that uses its ability to

Download sample

Download