Central Asian Art

Central Asian Art

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: B016XN12ZE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The strict prohibition on the representation of the human form has channeled artistic creation into architecture and architectural decoration. This book is a magical tour through Central Asia - Khirgizia, Tadjikistan, Turkmenia, and Uzbekistan - a cradle of Ancient civilisations and are pository of the Oriental arts inspired by Buddhism and Islam. There are magnificent, full-colour photographs of the abandoned cities of Mervand Urgench, Khiva, the capital of the Kharezm, with its mausoleum of Sheikh Seid Allahuddin,and, the Golden Road to Samarkand, the Blue City, a center of civilisation for 2,500 years.
form has channeled artistic creation into architecture and
architectural decoration. This book is a magical tour
through Central Asia - Khirgizia, Tadjikistan, Turkmenia,
and Uzbekistan - a cradle of Ancient civilisations and a
repository of the Oriental arts inspired by Buddhism and
Islam. There are magnificent, full-colour photographs of the
abandoned cities of Mervand Urgench, Khiva, the capital of
the Kharezm, with its mausoleum of Sheikh Seid Allahuddin,
and, the Golden Road to Samarkand, the Blue City, a
center of civilisation for 2,500 years.

Ideas About Art

Art Incorporated: The Story of Contemporary Art

Amazing Sculpture You Can Do (Gateways Fine Art)

Dialectical Passions: Negation in Postwar Art Theory

Ruskin and Modernism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the numerous Turkmen invasions, the Turkmen dynasties established themselves in this region. This period favoured the development of urban culture and the growth of towns, among which Merv – today abandoned – Samarkand, Khiva, and Bukhara remained representative of the essential spirit. Around 1150, the architecture of Central Asia was monochrome, but in the Tilya-Kori Madrasah. Samarkand, Uzbekistan. 10 middle of the 12th century blue brick began to be used and considerable progress was made

centuries. In those days, almost all the tribes of the region produced woven carpets with a short pile. The knot-stitched carpets were mainly produced by the Turkmans, and partly by the Kyrgyzstan and the Uzbekan breeder tribes. Rhyton, 2nd-1st century BCE. The National Museum of History and Ethnography, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. 153 The carpets of Central Asia, with short and long pile, had different purposes: floor coverings, prayer mats (djaïnamaz), and yurt portieres were widespread. The

woven practical objects were exceptional for their expressiveness and finishing. Oblong bags suspended with straps from the yurt’s frame in which clothes or crockery and food were put away. Various types of carpets were used for the Bookend, 19 -20 century. Republican Historical, Regional and Fine Arts Museum, Dushanbe, Tajikistan. harnessing of horses: saddle cloths, covers, saddlebow-bags (khourdjines), generally Obdon gourd, 19th-20th century. Republican Historical, Regional and Fine Arts

Khiva: graceful forms, elegance, and refinement of the engraved decoration. The works of M. Madaliev, a young carver from Kokand, reveal a radiant, optimistic vision of life and are an example on an original application of ancient traditions. The goldsmith’s trade is also flourishing. The goldsmith-jewellers work in the towns and regions of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, receiving orders for earrings, bracelets, rings, and other kinds of jewellery. S. Sakhatov, A. Kourbankouliev, K. Ataev continue

and the ancient expression of profound meditation and great wisdom that were given to him in the previous epochs. The same contrasts can be seen in the Bodhisattva’s faces. Their silhouettes remain lithe and well built but the shape of the body is only outlined, whilst necklaces and pleats of garments tightened with a belt are elaborated in detail. Secular faces are presented in a different manner. They are more realistic in spite of their idealised lines, probably executed from nature such as,

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